Kintsugi living blog — relationships

Embracing groundlessness to avoid shattering

Posted by Kenetha Stanton on

Embracing groundlessness to avoid shattering

© 2010 janet galore, Flickr | CC-BY I've been rereading Pema Chödrön's When Things Fall Apart: Heart Advice for Difficult Times lately, and I've been particularly struck in this reading by her exploration of the ways in which we aggressively attempt to solidify our ego-selves when facing situations that cause us to feel that there is no solid ground under our feet. She claims that one of the key ways we attempt to create a sense of solidness in the face of the uncertainty of life is through aggressively stating and justifying our opinions. We make our opinions into absolute...

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What is your chrysalis made of?

Posted by Kenetha Stanton on

What is your chrysalis made of?
Without the safe container of the chrysalis, the process that transforms a caterpillar to a butterfly cannot happen. In the same way, each of us needs our own chrysalis as we move through seasons of transformation. What is your safe container that facilitates your transformation?

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Stages of transformation

Posted by Kenetha Stanton on

Stages of transformation
The actual process of transformation is messy, painful, and confusing, especially when we don't know what to expect. Knowing the natural stages of transformation makes it easier to negotiate the process.

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Being wholly alive to ALL of life

Posted by Kenetha Stanton on

Being wholly alive to ALL of life

Anger! by Amy McTigue, on Flickr. Used via Creative Commons licensing. "The most solid advice ... for a writer is this, I think: Try to learn to breathe deeply, really to taste food when you eat, and when you sleep, really to sleep. Try as much as possible to be wholly alive, with all your might, and when you laugh, laugh like hell, and when you get angry, get good and angry. Try to be alive. You will be dead soon enough." ~William Saroyan Although this quote is ostensibly  advice for writers, it is equally good advice for anyone. We...

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Detachment: Living with open hands

Posted by Kenetha Stanton on

Detachment: Living with open hands

A bird in the hand is worth ... by laughingbird, on Flickr. Used via Creative Commons licensing. I first encountered the idea of detachment in reading Buddhist thought many years ago. I remember feeling rather put off by the whole idea. My concept of detachment at the time involved a total lack of emotion, of caring, or involvement with anyone or anything. It sounded to me like a bland and empty way to live, and I couldn't imagine how that could be beneficial to anyone. I could see how it might erase the pain, but it seemed to me that...

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